Hundreds of lawsuits filed over cardiovascular injuries linked to Onglyza & Kombiglyze

//Hundreds of lawsuits filed over cardiovascular injuries linked to Onglyza & Kombiglyze

Hundreds of lawsuits filed over cardiovascular injuries linked to Onglyza & Kombiglyze

Bristol-Myers Squibb is facing nearly 300 lawsuits in Kentucky over allegations that the diabetes drugs Onglyza and Kombiglyze XR may increase the risk of congestive heart failure and other cardiovascular side effects. The lawsuits were originally consolidated as part of a multidistrict litigation (MDL) in the District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky in 2018.

Onglyza (saxagliptin) and Kombiglyze XR (saxagliptin and metformin) were approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2009 and 2010 to treat patients with type-2 diabetes. The drugs are designed to help lower the blood sugar levels in diabetes patients.

A 2013 study conducted by Bristol-Myers Squibb known as SAVOR was the first to raise questions about the cardiovascular safety of Onglyza. Three years later, the FDA warned that patients who are treated with Onglyza or Kombiglyze may face an increased risk of heart failure. The FDA ordered Bristol-Myers Squibb to add a warning about the risk of heart failure to the drugs’ labeling in response to these findings.

Lawsuits Against Bristol-Myers Squibb Over Onglyza and Kombiglyze

Over the next few years, dozens of lawsuits were filed against Bristol-Myers Squibb involving Onglyza and Kombiglyze XR. The lawsuits alleged that patients were diagnosed with congestive heart failure or other cardiovascular problems after taking the diabetes drugs. These patients further alleged that Bristol-Myers Squibb knew or should have known about the increased risk of cardiovascular problems associated with Onglyza and Kombiglyze XR, and that the drugmaker failed to adequately warn patients about these risks.

By 2018, Bristol-Myers Squibb was facing at least 80 lawsuits over the link between Onglyza and Kombiglyze and an increase risk of heart problems. In February of that year, the lawsuits were consolidated by the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation in a federal MDL in Kentucky.

As of April 2019, Bristol-Myers Squibb was facing at least 272 lawsuits involving Onglyza and Kombiglyze as part of the Kentucky MDL. The patients who filed these lawsuits alleged that they suffered congestive heart failure, heart attacks, or other cardiovascular problems after they were treated with the diabetes drugs.

The first bellwether trial in the Onglyza and Kombiglyze litigation in Kentucky is scheduled to go to trial in 2020. Bellwether trials are designed to test plaintiffs’ allegations and lay the groundwork for a settlement of other pending claims as part of an MDL.

Contact Us for a Free Legal Consultation

If you or a loved one used the diabetes drugs Onglyza and Kombiglyze XR and were diagnosed with heart failure, congestive heart failure, heart attack, or other cardiovascular complications, you may be eligible to file a lawsuit and receive compensation for these injuries. The first step in taking legal action is to speak with an experienced pharmaceutical liability attorney who can advise you of your legal rights and guide you through the first steps in filing a claim.

The lawyers at Hissey, Mulderig & Friend have represented thousands of clients across the U.S. who have been harmed by dangerous drugs, defective medical devices, or other hazardous consumer products. Our firm was founded with the goal of providing its clients with outstanding legal representation to ensure that their legal rights are fully protected.

For more information about filing a Onglyza or Kombiglyze lawsuit and to find out if you qualify to take legal action, contact the lawyers at Hissey, Mulderig & Friend for a free legal consultation. You can reach us by calling toll-free at 1-866-275-4454, or by following this link to our free online case evaluation form.

By | 2019-08-14T17:27:35+00:00 August 14th, 2019|Onglyza & Kombiglyze|Comments Off on Hundreds of lawsuits filed over cardiovascular injuries linked to Onglyza & Kombiglyze

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